Guest Post: All in the Mind by Jenny Twist

I am delighted, yet again, to welcome back another of my past guest Bloggers.  This time it is the wonderful author, Jenny Twist, who has returned for a visit with her thought-provoking post about her new book; a novel with a sort of physical Benjamin Button syndrome twist to the plot. Thank you, Jenny, for being my guest again, and welcome back.Guest Blogger Jenny Twist on Amelia Curzon's Blog - Curzon

Years ago I read about an old folks’ home where they did the experiment of making their environment like that of their youth. I can’t remember where I read this or what they were attempting to prove, but I do remember that one surprising result was that the subjects’ hair darkened.

I’ve had the idea lurking at the back of my mind ever since. What if you carried the experiment to its logical conclusion?

Last year I entered Nanowrimo for the first time (a competition to write a novel in a month) and this was the idea that resurfaced when I sat down at my computer. I have never written so fast and furiously in my life before. The story just poured onto the page.

I kept coming across gaps in my knowledge but followed Stephen King’s advice and just wrote it, intending to deal with all that later. When I picked it up again a few weeks later and got down to seriously working on it I found I had to do a lot of research on the Second World War. I knew a fair bit already from reading and television documentaries, as well as the experiences of my own parents, but I needed to know things like what branded goods they used, how the rationing system worked, etc.

I also realised, when one of my characters suddenly got completely out of hand and decided to return to India, that I was woefully ignorant of Indian culture. I knew some from reading, and I had studied a lot of Indian history at university, but I had no idea whether my knowledge would suffice for modern-day India. The problem with something like that is you All in the Mind by Jenny Twist book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.comdon’t know what it is you don’t know. I did not realise, for example, that a Hindu would be unlikely to understand Urdu. So I appealed on Twitter for experts on Hindu culture to read and correct it. I had four responses and checked all their comments with Google. Thank you, you wonderful people. You’ve saved me a lot of embarrassment. And thank God for Google. It’s saved me weeks of work.

My dear friend, Caroline, read the proofs when she was staying with me and suggested the idea for a cover. She painted the beautiful hands. They belong to her mother, Anne Ritson, to whom the book is dedicated. The photograph is of my own mother, May Thornton, who was a nurse at the end of the Second World War.

So, to a large extent, this book is the product of friendship.

Here are some of the things other authors have to say about it:

Jenny Twist is an enormously talented story-weaver who just goes on getting better.  Fans of the wonderful novel, ‘Domingo’s Angel’ will not be disappointed with this latest offering from her.  It’s a sweet and haunting feel-good story which will immerse you totally in its fictional world and leave you feeling deeply satisfied.  Absolutely recommended.  (Lynette Sofras)

All in the Mind will take you on a mind trip, one from which you won’t want to return. As always, Jenny Twist’s fiction is an addictive treat that’s tightly woven to draw the readers in and keep them there.  (Su Halfwerk) 

This book moved me more than any other in recent memory, not because it was sad, although some scenes were very tragic, but because of the depth of emotion I felt for the characters, and the lasting love they share. . I dare anyone to read this book and not be moved to tears of joy.  (Tara Fox Hall)

Biography

Jenny Twist was born in York and brought up in the West Yorkshire mill town of Heckmondwike, the eldest grandchild of a huge extended family.

She left school at fifteen and went to work in an asbestos factory. After working in various jobs, including bacon-packer and escapologist’s assistant, she returned to full-time education and did a BA in history at Manchester and post-graduate studies at Oxford.

She stayed in Oxford working as a recruitment consultant for many years and it was there that she met and married her husband, Vic.

In 2001 they retired and moved to Southern Spain where they live with their rather eccentric dog and cat

Her first book, Take One At Bedtime, was published in April 2011 and the second, Domingo’s Angel, was published in July 2011. Her novella, Doppelganger, was published in the anthology Curious Hearts in July 2011, Uncle Vernon, was published in Spellbound, in November 2011, Jamey and the Alien and Uncle Albert’s Christmas were published in Warm Christmas Wishes in December 2011, Mantequero was published in the anthology Winter Wonders in December 2011 and Away With the Fairies, her first self-published story, in September 2012.

Her new anthology, with Tara Fox Hall, Bedtime Shadows, a collection of spooky, speculative and romance stories, was published 24th September 2012.

Her new novel, All in the Mind, about an old woman who mysteriously begins to get younger, will be published 24th October 2012.

A few other places to find Jenny

Website

Facebook

Goodreads Blog

Twitter

Email: casahoya@gmail.com

And a few more books …

Bedtime Shadows by Jenny Twist book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.com

Away with the Fairies by Jenny Twist book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.com

The novel Spellbound book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.com

The novel Domingo's Angel book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.com

The novel Winter Wonders book cover on aecurzon.wordpress.com

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17 thoughts on “Guest Post: All in the Mind by Jenny Twist

    • I wonder whether this was the same thing I saw? I had it firmly in my mind that it was something I read rather than a television programme, but it’s so long ago I can’t be sure. Did their hair get darker?

  1. Of course – Benjamin Button! I’d forgotten about that film. But really All in the Mind is far more satisfying in my opinion. I’m another one of the lucky people who has had a sneak preview of this wonderful story and I can say with every confidence that it’s a wonderful and gripping tale that will leave every reader feeling uplifted at the end. Jenny Twist truly knows how to weave a spellbinding story.

    • I managed to miss Benjamin Button. Just googled it. I thought it was rather sad. Poor chap. Merlin was also supposed to have lived backwards. Perhaps it was less of a problem for a wizard, but must have got tricky towards the end. Legend doesn’t say…
      Thank you for your kind words, Lynette

  2. This book is truly a treasure and I feel so privileged to have been one of the first to read it. It is possibly even better than Domingo’s Angel and if you haven’t read that yet then there’s something wrong with you, quite frankly.

    Jenny Twist is an amazing author and has given so much to her readers. Her books grab you and make feel one with the characters and they pour out emotions. I highly recommend everything she’s ever written!

    • Hi Paulette. Pleased to meet you, too. I must say I’m SO pleased with the cover myself. Caroline is such a star! I wrote the statutory 50,000 words in a month, but I had to go back to it and re-write and add in bits afterwards, so it probably took me more like 3 months altogether. But I do know people who DO really write a whole novel in a month. Tara, for instance (see above), I still can’t quite believe she’s only one person!

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